knee pain

Knee pain seems to be the most common physical complaint among adults,  weightlifters included. The good news is that lifting right strengthens the muscles around your knee and works to maintain, even increase, joint flexibility. Sometimes, though, knees hurt before you start lifting. The knee symptom checker at WebMD may help you understand your knee…
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Studies support milk for muscle-building

I was looking at some research news items and came across this one, “To gain muscle and lose fat, drink milk,” about a study conducted at McMaster University and published in 2007. The key finding of the study was that milk drinkers gained more muscle and lost more fat than participants who drank a carbohydrate-based…
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Chocolate milk indeed replenishes nutrients

You’ve heard the one about drinking chocolate milk after a workout, right? Well, it’s true, as explained in this news release from the University of Texas where John Ivy led research into the matter. That study put in practical terms the findings of other researchers, including M. Beelen and others, in such studies as “Nutritional…
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It’s possible to lift weight to lose weight

I wouldn’t necessarily recommend weightlifting as the center of someone’s weight-loss program, but weightlifting has the potential to help, especially if you are eating right. Kyler Crouse, in an article in the Tahoe Daily Tribune, explains how it could happen. The key is in the way muscle continues to consume calories even after your workout…
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Can strength training aid memory?

It’s pretty clear that exercise in general aids brain function. Still, it is interesting to see a recent finding that resistance training (which includes weightlifting) in particular seems to help the cognitive function of older women who were beginning to show cognitive decline. You can read about the study at Science Daily or ready the…
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Weight training linked to reduced diabetes risk

There are lots of good reasons to lift weights, but who would have thought that diabetes prevention was one of them? Apparently reseachers including Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, saw the possibilities. Their study, published in August in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that…
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Sources of weight-training injuries

The New York Times, in a report on a study about weight training injuries, notes that such injuries are on the rise and that most injuries result when people drop weights on themselves, crush a body part (fingers come to mind) between weights or hit themselves with the equipment. Given those sources of injuries, it…
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Is weightlifting safe?

Weightlifting certainly has a reputation as a dangerous activity, but various studies indicate it is much safer than other sports. You can read a selection of abstracts about weight training safety at the Exrx.net website. The safety of the sport, however, depends greatly on good technique, paying attention to what you are doing and being…
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